FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

ABOUT CAMELOT RULES

 

(You can find Frequently Asked Questions about general Camelot topics here.)

 

  

Click on any question below, and you will be linked to the answer.

 

Question: What is a Plain Move?

   

Question: May a piece move backwards?

   

Question: What is a Canter?

  

Question: Are pieces Cantered over removed from the board?

  

Question: May I Canter over an enemy piece?

  

Question: I know that a Knight may Canter over a Man.  May a Man Canter over a Knight?

  

Question: Itís my move, and I can Canter over one of my pieces.  Must I do so?

  

Question: May I Canter over more than one piece in a single move?

  

Question: While Cantering, may I change direction?

  

Question: While Cantering, must I keep on Cantering as long as I can?

   

Question: I have a possible Canter in which my piece would end up on the same square from which it started.  Am I allowed to do that?

  

Question: What is a Jump?

   

Question: Are Jumped pieces removed from the board?

 

Question: May I Jump a friendly piece?

 

Question: I know that a Knight may capture a Man by Jumping.  May a Man capture a Knight by Jumping?

 

Question: May I Jump more than one piece in a single move?  Must I keep on Jumping as long as I can?

 

Question: While Jumping, may I change direction?

 

Question: If I have two possible Jumps, do I have to choose the one that captures the most pieces?

 

Question: Knights and Men appear to have the same abilities.  Is there any difference between a Knight and a Man?

 

Question: Itís my move, and I can Jump an enemy piece.  Am I forced to Jump?

 

Question: Itís my move, and I can Jump an enemy piece.  Are there any exceptional circumstances under which I may ignore the compulsion to capture?

 

Question: I know that a Knightís Charge combines two types of moves―Canter and Jump.  However, may the Knight Jump and then Canter during a Knightís Charge?  Alternatively, during a Knightís Charge, may the Knight Canter, then Jump, then Canter some more?

 

Question: Itís my move, and I donít have any possible Jumps, but I have a possible Knightís Charge.  Am I obligated to Charge?

 

Question: Itís my move, and I donít have any possible Jumps.  While Cantering one of my Knights, Iíve reached a square where itís possible to Jump an enemy piece.  Must I do so?

 

Question: My opponent just made his move.  He had a possible Jump, but he made a move that didnít result in a capture.  Must I tell him to take his move back and make a capturing move, or may I accept his move?

 

Question: May I move one of my pieces into my own Castle?

 

Question: My Parker Brothers rules say that if Iíve Jumped over my opponentís  piece into my own Castle, my turn must end there, even if another enemy piece is so  positioned that I could continue the Jump out of my Castle.  However, the WCF rules say that I must continue the Jump out of my Castle.  Which rules are correct?

 

Question: If I Jump my opponentís piece and end up in my own Castle, the rules say that I have to move out on my next turn.  However, what if, after my opponentís move, I have a possible Jump somewhere else on the board.  The rules also say that I have to Jump.  Which rule should I follow?

 

Question: On my previous move, I Jumped into my own Castle.  I now have the possibility of either Plain Moving out or Jumping out.  May I choose either move?

 

Question: On my previous move, I Jumped into my own Castle with my Knight.  I now have the possibility of either Jumping out or moving out with a Knightís Charge.  May I choose either move?

 

Question: Once I move one of my pieces into my opponentís Castle, may I move that piece out?

 

Question: Is there any limit to the number of Castle Moves that I can make in a game?

 

Question: My Parker Brothers rules say that youíve lost the game if your side is reduced to one piece.  However, the WCF rules say that the game isnít over if you have only one piece.  Which rules are correct?

 

Question: The WCF rules say that stalemate is a loss for the stalemated player.  Shouldnít stalemate be a draw, as in Chess?

 

Question: I have an old Camelot board on which the squares are numbered 1 through 156, A, B, Y, and Z. But I notice that the WCF rules use a different, algebraic notation system.  Why the change?

 

Question: One copy of my Parker Brothers rules says that the two colors of the players are red and yellow.  Another copy says red and green.  In addition, both copies allow either player to move first from that player's respective starting position.  However, I notice that the WCF rules make different stipulations.  Why the change?

  

Question: What if I have a question that isnít answered here?

 

 

 

Question: What is a Plain Move?

Answer: The Plain Move, one of the three basic Camelot move types, occurs when a piece (either a Knight or a Man) moves one square in any direction (horizontally, vertically, or diagonally) to an unoccupied adjoining square.

 

Question: May a piece move backwards?

Answer: Yes.  A piece (either a Knight or a Man) may move in any direction, including moving backwards.

 

Question: What is a Canter?

Answer: A Canter, one of the three basic Camelot move types, occurs when a piece (either a Knight or a Man) leaps in any direction (horizontally, vertically, or diagonally) over a friendly piece (either a Knight or a Man) that occupies an adjoining square, onto an unoccupied square immediately beyond it in a direct line.

 

Question: Are pieces Cantered over removed from the board?

Answer: No.  A piece Cantered over is not removed from the board.

 

Question: May I Canter over an enemy piece?

Answer: No.  Only friendly pieces may be Cantered over.

 

Question: I know that a Knight may Canter over a Man.  May a Man Canter over a Knight?

Answer: Yes.  Any piece may Canter over any other friendly piece.

 

Question: Itís my move, and I can Canter over one of my pieces.  Must I do so?

Answer: No.  A Canter is never mandatory.

 

Question: May I Canter over more than one piece in a single move?

Answer: Yes.  You may Canter over multiple friendly pieces.

 

Question: While Cantering, may I change direction?

Answer: Yes.  You may change direction as often as the position permits.

 

Question: While Cantering, must I keep on Cantering as long as I can?

Answer: No.  You may end the Canter whenever you choose.

 

Question: I have a possible Canter in which my piece would end up on the same square from which it started.  Am I allowed to do that?

Answer: No.  A Canter that begins and ends on the same square is not allowed.

 

Question: What is a Jump?

Answer: A Jump, one of the three basic Camelot move types, occurs when a piece (either a Knight or a Man) leaps in any direction (horizontally, vertically, or diagonally) over an opposing piece (either a Knight or a Man) that occupies an adjoining square, onto an unoccupied square immediately beyond it in a direct line.

 

Question: Are Jumped pieces removed from the board?

Answer: Yes.  A Jumped piece is captured and immediately removed from the board.

 

Question: May I Jump a friendly piece?

Answer: No.  Only enemy pieces may be Jumped.

 

Question: I know that a Knight may capture a Man by Jumping.  May a Man capture a Knight by Jumping?

Answer: Yes.  Any piece may Jump any other enemy piece.

 

Question: May I Jump more than one piece in a single move?  Must I keep on Jumping as long as I can?

Answer: Yes to both questions.  Having Jumped over one enemy piece, the Jumping must continue as a part of that same move if your piece reaches a square next to another exposed enemy piece.

 

Question: While Jumping, may I change direction?

Answer: Yes.  You may change direction as often as the position permits.

 

Question: If I have two possible Jumps, do I have to choose the one that captures the most pieces?

Answer: No.  If presented with capturing alternatives, you may choose which opposing piece to capture, as well as with which of your pieces to effect the capture.

 

Question: Knights and Men appear to have the same abilities.  Is there any difference between a Knight and a Man?

Answer: Yes.  A Knight (only) may combine a Canter and a Jump in a single move, called a Knightís Charge.

 

Question: Itís my move, and I can Jump an enemy piece.  Am I forced to Jump?

Answer: If a Jump is available, you are compelled to capture either by a Jump or by a Knightís Charge. 

 

Question: Itís my move, and I can Jump an enemy piece.  Are there any exceptional circumstances under which I may ignore the compulsion to capture?

Answer: When there is a Jump available, the only exception to the capture compulsion is if on the previous move you have Jumped into your own Castle.  In that case, only, you must ignore the compulsion to capture, and vacate your Castle.

 

Question: I know that a Knightís Charge combines two types of moves―Canter and Jump.  However, may the Knight Jump and then Canter during a Knightís Charge?  Alternatively, during a Knightís Charge, may the Knight Canter, then Jump, then Canter some more?

Answer: No.  A Knightís Charge must follow the order of, and is limited to, first the Canter(s) and last the Jump(s).

 

Question:   Itís my move, and I donít have any possible Jumps, but I have a possible Knightís Charge.  Am I obligated to Charge?

Answer: No.  You are never obligated to make a Knightís Charge.

 

Question: Itís my move, and I donít have any possible Jumps.  While Cantering one of my Knights, Iíve reached a square where itís possible to Jump an enemy piece.  Must I do so?

Answer: Yes.  The Canter of your Knight has now become a Knightís Charge, so you must make a capturing move, either immediately, or later in this move. 

 

Question: My opponent just made his move.  He had a possible Jump, but he made a move that didnít result in a capture.  Must I tell him to take his move back and make a capturing move, or may I accept his move?

Answer: You must tell him to take his move back.  A player who makes an illegal move must retract that move and make a legal move.  If the mistake is only noticed later on, the game must be restarted from the position in which the error occurred.

 

Question: May I move one of my pieces into my own Castle?

Answer: You may not enter your Castle by means of either a Plain Move or a Canter or the Cantering portion of a Knightís Charge.  You may, however, enter your Castle by means of a Jump or the Jumping portion of a Knightís Charge.

 

Question: My Parker Brothers rules say that if Iíve Jumped over my opponentís  piece into my own Castle, my turn must end there, even if another enemy piece is so  positioned that I could continue the Jump out of my Castle.  However, the WCF rules say that I must continue the Jump out of my Castle.  Which rules are correct?

Answer: You must continue the Jump out of your Castle.  The World Camelot Federation Official Rules of Camelot are the rules that you must follow―they supersede the Parker Brothers rules. 

 

Question: If I Jump my opponentís piece and end up in my own Castle, the rules say that I have to move out on my next turn.  However, what if, after my opponentís move, I have a possible Jump somewhere else on the board.  The rules also say that I have to Jump.  Which rule should I follow?

Answer: You must vacate your Castle.  That move takes priority over the requirement to Jump.

 

Question: On my previous move, I Jumped into my own Castle.  I now have the possibility of either Plain Moving out or Jumping out.  May I choose either move?

Answer: No.  If you have the ability to vacate your Castle with a Jump, you must choose that over a non-capturing move.

 

Question: On my previous move, I Jumped into my own Castle with my Knight.  I now have the possibility of either Jumping out or moving out with a Knightís Charge.  May I choose either move?

Answer: Yes.  You may satisfy the requirement of vacating your Castle with a capturing move by making a Knightís Charge.

 

Question: Once I move one of my pieces into my opponentís Castle, may I move that piece out?

Answer: No.  That piece must remain in your opponentís Castle, but may move from one Castle Square to the other (called a Castle Move).

 

Question: Is there any limit to the number of Castle Moves that I can make in a game?

Answer: Yes.  You are allowed at most two Castle Moves per game.

 

Question: My Parker Brothers rules say that youíve lost the game if your side is reduced to one piece.  However, the WCF rules say that the game isnít over if you have only one piece.  Which rules are correct?

Answer: The game is not over.  The World Camelot Federation Official Rules of Camelot are the rules that you must follow―they supersede the Parker Brothers rules.  Two or more pieces vs. one piece is not a win; its outcomeópossibly a drawóis yet to be determined.  In some Parker Brothers rules, a win by elimination required the elimination of all of the opponentís pieces.  In other Parker Brothers rules, however, the wording was changed to ďelimination of all, or all but one, of the opponentís pieces.Ē  This change in wording resulted from the fact that it is not possible, with correct play, for one piece to stop another (opposing) piece from entering its Castle.  Thus, if one side has two pieces and the other side one piece, it is impossible (with correct play) for the one to stop the two, even if the stronger side already has one of its pieces in the opponentís Castle, and even if the weaker side temporarily has the opposition (a position where the pieces are on the same rank, file, or diagonal with an odd number of squares separating them, and the stronger side must move, thereby allowing the weaker side to stop the advance of the stronger sideís piece).  This change in wording, however, not only failed to take into account possible misplays by the stronger side; much more importantly, it failed to take into account situations where the weaker side could initiate a combination (a series of forced moves that leads to a significant change in positional or material advantage) that would, although reducing itself to one piece, reduce the stronger opposing side to one piece or no pieces, thus securing a draw.   

 

Question: The WCF rules say that stalemate is a loss for the stalemated player.  Shouldnít stalemate be a draw, as in Chess?

Answer: The game is won if a player has two or more of his own pieces left and his opponent is unable to make a legal move.  Stalemate is a win for the stalemating player, a loss for the stalemated player.  Stalemate most commonly occurs when one side has only one piece, is in its opponentís Castle, and has exhausted its two Castle Moves.  However, stalemate is a win only if the stalemating player has two or more pieces left; otherwise, with both players only having one remaining piece, the game is drawn, with or without the occurrence of stalemate.

 

Question: I have an old Camelot board on which the squares are numbered 1 through 156, A, B, Y, and Z. But I notice that the WCF rules use a different, algebraic notation system.  Why the change?

Answer: The algebraic notation system is simpler and more logical to use, and conforms to modern standards of game notation.  Oddly enough, Parker Brothers advocated using an Abbreviated Algebraic Notation system in its game of Chivalry, the forerunner of Camelot.  Unfortunately, the abbreviation resulted in Jumps not being differentiated from Canters, and worse yet, intermediate leaps not being specified.  As a result, Camelot was introduced using a Numerical Notation system.  To standardize the recording of games, the World Camelot Federation adopted a Full Algebraic Notation system.

 

Question: One copy of my Parker Brothers rules says that the two colors of the players are red and yellow.  Another copy says red and green.  In addition, both copies allow either player to move first from that player's respective starting position.  However, I notice that the WCF rules make different stipulations.  Why the change?

Answer: To standardize the recording of games, and in so doing simplify the comparison of game scores, the WCF rules specify that the colors of the two players are White and Black, and that White always moves first from the same starting position.

 

Question: What if I have a question that isnít answered here?

Answer: I promise that no question will go unanswered!  Feel free to contact me at michael@worldcamelotfederation.com with any questions you have, no matter how simple, no matter how complex.